English

Courses tagged with "English"

Overview
This course will demonstrate the data resources available from operational program. The focus will be on operational activities, how to download data and use software to visualize. It will be a mix of practical and theoretical.

Aims and Objectives
- To provide an introduction to Operational Oceanography.
- Discovery and Use of Operational Ocean Data Products and Services.
- Hands on for Visualizing the model and in situ derived data products.

Learning outcomes
- Knowledge and understanding of Operational Oceanography.
- Tasks involved in Operational Analysis and Forecast methods.
- Oceanographic Data sources, Quality Control/Quality Assurance, monitoring systems and methods.
- Tools for visualizing the operational ocean data products.

Target audiences include, but not limited to the following:
- Ocean and coastal data managers.
- Researchers intending to use data products for scientific analysis.
- Research scholars at various universities.

Category: 2017

The workshop includes classroom training as well as a hands-on experience on-board RV Mtafiti covering all aspects on how to operate and plan a scientific cruise, demonstrations of the use and maintenance of marine sampling equipment, oceanographic (biological, chemical and physical data) sampling applied to the local demands, data collection and data management.

The ambition of the workshop is to:

create a critical pool of staff in the WIO-region (and beyond) with the capacity to effectively undertake oceanographic research using RV Mtafiti and to act as scientific campaign leaders for their scientific crew during research cruises;
ensure the cost-effective use of ship time and guarantee the excellence and quality of data as well as samples collected during surveys and therefore maximize the benefits to be gained from cruises undertaken using RV Mtafiti;
create awareness of the availability of RV Mtafiti for regional research campaigns and promote the deployment of RV Mtafiti for joint research and education projects.
The workshop is organised in collaboration with the IOC Project Office for IODE (link is external) (Oostende, Belgium) and the UNESCO/IOC Sub-Commission for Africa and the Adjacent Island States (link is external) (IOC Africa in Nairobi, Kenya) and contributes to the Second International Indian Ocean Expedition (link is external) (IIOE2) (2015-2020).

Classroom courses and onboard training will be made available online through the OCeanTeacher Global Academy (link is external) Platform.

The trainers are Andre Cattrijsse, Francisco Hernandez, Klaas Deneudt and Harrison Ong’anda. Guest speakers are Mika Odido, Renison Ruwa and Enock Wakwabi . They will share their expertise and experiences gained over the years deploying RV Mtafiti (formerly RV Zeeleeuw) and RV Simon Stevin in the North Sea and their expertise and knowledge on data management.

Coordinators: Nina Wambiji (KMFRI) and Delphine Vanhaecke (VLIZ)

Category: 2016

Overview

The course provides an overview and hands on GIS applications pertaining to operational geospatial services pertaining to oceanography and coastal zone using ArcGIS software. This comprises the data acquisition, processing, analysis and interpretation of spatial data and generate the specific thematic inputs to marine and coastal programs.

Aims and Objectives

  • To provide an introduction to GIS for marine applications
  • Utilization of open source spatial data
  • To provide hands on GIS applications pertaining to ocean and coast

Learning Outcomes

  • Knowledge and understanding of GIS, spatial data, raster and vector models
  • Core tasks involved in the GIS analysis process including data acquisition, management, manipulation and analysis, and presentation and output
  • Core functionality of ArcMap, Arc Catalogue and Arc Toolbox
  • Creating and editing spatial data
  • Awareness of coastal and marine GIS data applications

Target Audience

Target audiences include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Ocean and coastal data managers
  • Staff and researchers working on marine GIS applications
  • University graduates
Category: 2016

Overview

This course introduces the concept, development, applications and evaluation of metadata. Through a combination of practical exercises, participants will critically examine metadata issues, standards, and best practices, and will evaluate the role of metadata in Ocean data management.

Objectives

  • To introduce Marine Data Managers to the concept of metadata
  • To introduce metadata standards used to describe marine data
  • To highlight the importance of metadata for your organization
  • To provide practical experience in writing good metadata.

Learning Outcomes

  • Understand the principles, concepts and types of metadata
  • Explore various metadata standards
  • Understand different issues in the applications of metadata standards
  • Gain experience in applying selected metadata standards to the creation of   metadata records
  • Practical  experience in use of an open source catalogue application to manage metadata
  • Implement metadata decisions in ocean data project

Class photo

Category: 2016

This course provides an in depth overview of the application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to the marine environment using ArcGIS.

Aims and Objectives:

  • Provide an introduction to GIS for marine applications
  • Focus on some publicly available marine datasets
  • Show the potential applications of GIS for the marine environment

Learning Outcomes:

  • Knowledge and understanding of GIS, spatial data, raster and vector models
  • Core tasks involved in the GIS analysis process including data acquisition, management, manipulation and analysis, and presentation and output
  • Core functionality of ArcMap, Arc Catalogue and Arc Toolbox
  • Creating and editing spatial data
  • Appreciation of coastal and marine GIS data applications
Category: 2015

On the Use of the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Programme (GTSPP) Data

Category: 2015

The concept of quality management has become increasingly significant for many National Oceanographic Data Centres to meet national and international competency standards for delivery of data products and services. The IODE is developing a Quality Management Framework for NODCs that includes the implementation of technical standards and quality management systems which will lead to the accreditation of NODCs.

This training workshop provides an introduction for NODCs and ADUs involved in the development, implementation and management of a Quality Management System which will assist in the adoption of comprehensive management practices and increased confidence in the quality of their data, products and services.

This is a practical workshop. The participants will work in teams to complete workshop exercises on each topic to reinforce learning and understanding of the requirements for a quality management system and the IODE accreditation for NODCs.

Category: 2015

On the Use of the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Programme (GTSPP) Data

Category: 2014

ODINAFRICA Ocean Data Portal training course

Category: 2014
Category: 2014

ODINAFRICA Ocean Data Portal training-of-trainers course

Category: 2013

ODINAFRICA ODV Workshop for the Benguela Current LME Region

Category: 2013

First SeaDataNet 2

Category: 2012

This course provides an introduction to the steps required to manage and archive marine data including the guiding principles of data management and typical responsibilities for data managers.

Category: 2011

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to a wide variety of earth science datasets, formats and analysis software. Students will learn and practice methods using a common ocean area, and they are expected to create a personal project of data products for a marine region of their own choosing. Personal projects are presented by the students at the end of the course.

Aims and Objectives:

  • Provide an introduction to the use of free software for synthesis of marine data and analyses
  • Recognize the importance of good research data management practice;
  • Creation and use of multi-parameter marine data collections to prepare and publish standard data products
  • Develop marine data and products from multiple sources using selected software programs
Category: POGO

CofE Ocean Data Management (2016)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to a wide variety of earth science datasets, formats and analysis software. Students will learn and practice methods using a common ocean area, and they are expected to create a personal project of data products for a marine region of their own choosing. Personal projects are presented by the students at the end of the course.CofE class

Aims and Objectives:

- Provide an introduction to the use of free software for synthesis of marine data and analyses
- Recognize the importance of good research data management practice and the role of data managers;

- Creation and use of multi-parameter marine data collections to prepare and publish standard data products
- Develop marine data and products from multiple sources using selected software programs

Category: POGO

Joint Course IODE-NF-POGO CofE (2015)

Category: POGO

Workshop Scope- this workshop was given pre-IAMSLIC Conference, Mar del Plata Argentina October, 2010 - Linda Pikula, NOAA

Participants will learn how to prepare strong grant proposals. Elements of general proposal writing will be discussed:  mission, purpose, budgets, partnerships, timelines, the value of pilot projects, possible sources of funding, consideration of continuity of project through permanent funding.  A bibliography of resources is provided.  Examples of weak proposals will be critiqued.

Libraries traditionally have formed a preservation safety net for materials that will be transmitted to subsequent generations of information seekers and scholars. For paper-based documents, provision of adequate storage conditions was the best means to help ensure that materials would remain readable far into the future. With the advent of digital technology, many knowledge creators do their work on computers. Some of that knowledge may be printed on paper, but much of it, particularly databases, geographic information, scientific data sets, and Web sites, exists only in electronic form. At the same time, traditional forms of publications have changed significantly and, as a result, create new challenges. For example, publishers of electronic journals license their content to libraries, but libraries do not own that content and they may not have rights to capture digital content to preserve it. Who will preserve these materials?

Which organizations or systems will provide the needed preservation safety net for electronic materials?
What tools, technologies and standards are available to preserve information in digital format?
What are the best practices that can help us to address long-term digital archiving for a range of file formats and media types?

This course will examine these questions, as well as provide an introduction to the metadata needed for a digital environment, terminology, cross walking, harvesting, interoperability and metadata frequently used to describe digital collections. Practical hands-on exercises will be included. Through a combination of lecture, case studies and interactive sessions, students will learn about the long-term preservation requirements of digital assets.

e- Repositories (digital repositories) are the backbone of the Open Access Movement and over the years they have grown from supporting only research literature to encompassing data, and multimedia etc. and often have become an organizations' holistic digital asset management tool.  Encouraging researchers to deposit into an institutions digital repository requires targeted advocacy and efficient communication and outreach. This course will explore important repository aspects and address issues faced by those intending or implementing and managing their own repository or using the open, free, secure and permanent marine science thematic repository (OceanDocs). Communication & Outreach tools sessions will discuss and offer practical experience of creating websites and social media. An OceanDocs workshop will demonstrate and explore the benefits of joining the OceanDocs Community of depositors and users.  Practical exercises will be included.

Category: 2016

Development and Management of e-Repositories

Category: 2013

The Digital Asset Management (DAM) Workshop will give participants the opportunity to explore a wide array of topics typically associated with a DAM infrastructure. Topics relevant to content creation, asset management, and dissemination will be presented during the workshop. Over the course of four days participants will have the opportunity to evaluate each topic area presented and develop a concept model based on the needs of the aquatic and marine science community. Several case studies will be presented throughout the course and working in groups, participants will interact with others who have similar asset management needs. Enterprise DAM is a very broad topic where infrastructure development in most cases requires careful assessment of the types of assets created, the ways in which they are used, and careful lifecycle management planning as these issues relate to the specific community of users. Participants should leave the workshop with an understanding of the purpose and value of DAM, the core principles typically associated with this type of system, and have articulated a first-level assessment of DAM needs within the community by creating a conceptual diagram.

Category: 2013

Grant Writing For Digital Projects 2012

Category: 2012

Preservation of Books and Other Media

21-25 May 2012

Category: 2012

Course Description
There are a number of training courses devoted to data management and access. However most seem to be geared toward the scientist. As libraries become partners in the curation and archiving of research data, existing skill sets must be expanded and new expertise developed. This course will introduce information professionals to the history of scientific data and the e-science lifecycle. Practical experience in digitization of a document with inclusion of data link will be accomplished.

Category: 2011

Purpose of this course is to introduce students to various tools and techniques for dealing with damage caused to library resources from accidents caused due to natural disasters or human error.

Category: 2011

Course Description
The need for effective outreach is greater than ever given the present day competition for economic resources. This will be a highly practical course which looks at the techniques and technologies that libraries and information managers can use to develop and implement communications, marketing programs and create a solid baseline for measuring outreach strategies.


Topics Covered:
• Communicating with Management
- Emphasis on local standards, policies, protocol
- Draft convincing advocacy document for MIM program
• Communicating with the Public
- Implementation of a web and social media presence-class creation of an outreach video, individual creation of a blog or facebook page
• Public Speaking and Presentation Techniques in general
- Individual Creation of powerpoint or poster presentation on local topic
• Outreach
- Development of partnerships, collaborations, networks
- Planning outreach events, communication resources, training skills for colleagues
- Interview techniques


Learning Outcomes
• Improved skills in using new technologies to communicate science and marine information
• Advanced oral and written presentation skills
• Improved collaboration skills within the organization and amongst marine professionals nationally and internationally
• Increased knowledge of resources available – forms, permissions, copyright, Rights management, protocols and policies.

Lecturers

Linda Pikula

Pauline Simpson

Roger Longhorn

__

Course Dates

7 - 11 November, 2011, Oostende, Belgium

Category: 2011

The Digital Asset Management (DAM) Workshop will give participants the opportunity to explore a wide array of topics typically associated with a DAM infrastructure. Topics relevant to content creation, asset management, and dissemination will be presented during the workshop. Over the course of four days participants will have the opportunity to evaluate each topic area presented and develop a concept model based on the needs of the aquatic and marine science community. Several case studies will be presented throughout the course and working in groups, participants will interact with others who have similar asset management needs. Enterprise DAM is a very broad topic where infrastructure development in most cases requires careful assessment of the types of assets created, the ways in which they are used, and careful lifecycle management planning as these issues relate to the specific community of users. Participants should leave the workshop with an understanding of the purpose and value of DAM, the core principles typically associated with this type of system, and have articulated a first-level assessment of DAM needs within the community by creating a conceptual diagram.

Category: 2010 & Before

Purpose of this course is to introduce students to various tools and techniques for dealing with damage caused to library resources from accidents caused due to natural disasters or human error.

Category: 2010 & Before

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the numerous types of standard and current works, reference materials, bibliographic sources, and Web portals in the marine sciences. In addition, some historical texts in Oceanography and cruises will be highlighted. The course emphasizes various approaches to searching for information and to the bibliographic structure of disciplines. Students will evaluate sources, search for information, and investigate topics in the marine sciences. Collection development will be discussed. This course will include E-Science Trends – one day course and assignment with an overview of the current landscape and how the Web is being utilized for the advancement of science and scholarly communication. Real-life examples will be given on how major communities such as librarians, publishers, and federal STI program leaders are using the Web to advance scientific knowledge and scholarly communication.

Category: 2010 & Before

Developing interesting and useful marine information products to populate a library-related website.

Category: 2010 & Before

Students will learn about different types of documents librarians are expected to write and use in the course of their professional careers, including job descriptions, memoranda, letters, reports, proposals, and both popular and scholarly papers. They will learn the elements of professional and scholarly writing and be given practice in writing selected documents, with editorial feedback. Instruction will be given in the peer review process, copyright , manuscript preparation, citation and reference management tools and communicating science to the public. In-class writing practice and critique, and individual class projects.

Category: 2010 & Before

Overview
The course provides an introduction to the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS). This includes best practices in marine biogeographic data management, data publication, data access, data analysis and data visualisation. 

Aims and Objectives
- Expand the OBIS network of collaborators
- Improve marine biogeographic data quality
- Increase awareness of international standards and best practices related to marine biogeographic data
- Increase the amount of open access data published through OBIS and its OBIS nodes
- Increase the use of data from OBIS for science, species conservation and area-based management applications

Learning Outcomes
- Knowledge and understanding of OBIS structure, mission and objectives
- Installation and management of IPT
- Use of Darwin Core standards for species occurrence records, taxonomy, event/sample records and additional biological and environmental parameters.
- Data quality control tools
- Publishing data through IPT and contributing datasets to OBIS
- Use of OBIS data access (SQL, web service, API/R). 
- Data visualisation tools (ArGIS online, …) 

Target Audience
- Marine data managers
- Staff of NODCs or ADUs/OBIS nodes working with marine biodiversity data
- Principle Investigators of major marine biodiversity expeditions
- National marine biodiversity focal points

Category: OBIS

A Marine Spatial Planning exercise using OBIS data and many other geographically referenced layers. Participants play a role game in which they have to propose in consensus a different management options for a proposed Marine Managed Area. During the exercise, the participants will practice some of the main principles of the marine spatial planning methodology.

Category: OBIS

A Marine Spatial Planning exercise using OBIS data and many other geographically referenced layers. Participants play a role game in which they have to propose in consensus a Marine Protected Area. During the exercise, the participants will practice some of the main principle of the marine spatial planning methodology.

Category: OBIS 2016
Category: OBIS 2014

The collection and organization of data is an integral and critical part of a research process. Management of research data is a service area of increasing interest to researchers and data managers. It covers the planning, creating, storing, organizing, accessing, sharing, describing, publishing and curating of data. Most public funded research have listed data as a key deliverable hence the need for skills on how to access, preserve and archive data.
Marine information managers are increasingly seen as major contributors to RDM activities in general and in the design of research data services (RDS) in particular. They promote research by providing services for storage, discovery and access, liaise and partner with researchers and data centers to foster an inter-operable infrastructure for the above services. Most information managers are looking for opportunities to develop their RDM related skills.

Course Objectives
The course will provide comprehensive training in research data management in order to lay the foundations for a common approach for research data management amongst researchers, repositories and facilities (including libraries) that manage marine data, thereby helping to ensure that the data is accessible, standardized and maintained over time.

Category: 2017

This one-day high-level, hands-on training activity on several aspects of Ocean Science Communication is organized within the framework of the Ocean Teacher Global Academy (OTGA) of UNESCO/IOC IODE.

In the context of ocean governance and marine resource management bolstering understanding of ocean science and its possible applications for society at large is the most effective way to trigger concrete actions in favour of a healthier, sustainable ocean. The need for effective ocean science communication is greater than ever given the present day competition for funding resources and involvement from the general public. This will be a hands-on course that looks at techniques and technologies, with a specific focus on digital storytelling and the use of social media, which people working in ocean science can use to develop and implement communication and outreach programs.

Category: 2016

This training course seeks to bring together marine researchers, data/document managers and marine data librarians to develop an agreed approach to sound data management for all research activities conducted as part of the second International Indian Ocean Expedition (IIOE-2). The second International Indian Ocean Expedition (IIOE-2) is a major new program of the IOC in partnership with the Indian Ocean Global Ocean Observing System (IOGOOS) Regional Alliance and the Scientific Committee for Oceanographic Research (SCOR). Over the next 5 years, a large number of IIOE-2 related research activities will collect new data on a range of physical, biogeochemical, biological and coupled climatic characteristics of the Indian Ocean.  Basic scientific research requires sound data management practices and one of the overarching objectives of IIOE-2 will be to support the collection and curation of all data to encourage data sharing using internationally agreed rules of data exchange, and to facilitate data discovery and use in the long term.

Class

This course will cover the planning, creating, storing, organizing, accessing, sharing, describing, publishing and curating of data in the context of IIOE-2 and its data and information management objectives. The course content has broad applicability in the field of research data management in general.

Category: 2016

Research Data Management (RDM) covers the planning, creating, storing, organizing, accessing, sharing, describing, publishing and curating of data. RDM is mandated by many funding agencies and increasingly by governments to provide access to funded research results.

The management of data, particularly large-scale data, has many challenges, and the roles of researchers, facilities that manage marine data, repositories and libraries are coming together to provide access, preservation and archive of this data and the scholarly products associated with it.

Category: 2015

OTGA Train The Trainers

Category: 2015

ICAN7 Workshop 19-20 April 2015, Cape Town, South Africa

Category: 2015

Indian National Center for Ocean Information Service (INCOIS) under Earth System Science Organization (ESSO) is a dedicated institution for operational oceanography and the only institution in the Indian region that has been providing operational ocean information and advisory services over the past 10 years. It has established leadership particularly in ocean observations, ocean modeling and ocean information and advisory services in the Indian Ocean region.

ESSO-INCOIS and UNESCO's Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC-UNESCO) signed a Memorandum of Agreement on 4 July 2013 during the 27th session of the IOC Assembly in Paris, for cooperation in conducting training courses at the International Training Centre for Operational Oceanography (ITCOocean) set up by ESSO-INCOIS in Hyderabad, India. The Centre aims at promoting the development and optimization of scientific base, technology and information system for operational oceanography at national, regional and global levels. The Centre has conducted four training courses during 2013-14 in various themes in operational oceanography (For more details kindly visit www.incois.gov.in)

Category: 2014

Web Content Management With Joomla 2.5

Category: 2013

Organizing, structuring and populating semi-technical websites to help users find and utilize internal and external Web-based resources and services relating to specific marine institutions (e.g. libraries, information centers, data centers). Application of current coding and style standards to create Web documents, with some attention to standard metadata requirements. Evaluation of Web site quality and usability, and assessment of resource discovery tools. Maintenance of web links. Adding graphics to websites. Content inventory, organization, and management in support of wayfinding and navigation. Following this general introduction, data managers and information managers will work separately on specific resource development and addition for their respective websites.

Category: 2011 & Before

Cape Town, South Africa

SPINCAM-OTGA workshop on 'Ocean Governance and Sustainable Based Economy /Gobernanza y Economía Sostenible del Océano'

Category: SPINCAM

The Course is organized by the Stazione Zoologica in cooperation with the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and the IOC Science and Communication Centre on Harmful Algae

IOC Training Course and Certification in Identification of Harmful Marine Algae (2016)

IOC Training Course and Certification in Identification of Harmful Marine Algae (2015)

IOC Training Course and Certification on Identification of Harmful Marine Algae, University of Copenhagen, May - August 2014

IOC Training Course and Certification on Identification of Harmful Marine Algae, University of Copenhagen, May - August 2013

Harmful Algal Bloom Programme - BEQUALM (2015)

Harmful Algal Bloom Programme - BEQUALM (2014)

Harmful Algal Bloom Programme - BEQUALM (2013)

Welcome to the 2017 IPI taxonomy HAB online quiz. Analysts have until the 29th of September 2017 to complete the exercise. Only one attempt to the exercise is allowed and once the exercise is submitted analysts won't have access to it again.

There are 14 questions and a maximum grade of 100% for a perfect score. All questions carry the same marks.

There are different type of questions in this quiz (matching, numerical and short answer). Please note that in short answer type questions where you are asked to write the answer, please make sure that the grammar is correct. Incorrect grammar will give an incorrect answer. Capitalize the first letter of the genus name of a species in your answer, otherwise the answer will be given as wrong, even if it is the correct name. Don't use punctuation after your answer. Numerical type questions require you input a number in the answer not a word (that is for example: 5 rather than five).

If your computer doesn't display a particular image correctly, check the zoom in your browser and change the setting from 100% zoom to 75% or less if necessary. You need to be able to view the full image before you answer the questions. Please remember that the programme shuffles the questions around, so that if you have a plate with images A to E and a drop down list with the answers,  don't assume that the first question correspond to image A, the second to image B and so on. Pay attention to this.

Also, read the questions fully and carefully before attempting to answer them.You only have one attempt at the quiz but you can login, review your answers, save them and change them as many times as you need to, as long as you don't submit them.

Please review your work carefully before submitting. Once submitted, you won't be able to access the quiz again only for review.

Training of trainers and technology validation on the Global Nutrient Management Toolbox

Training objective: To enable trainees to effectively use the Global Nutrient Management Toolbox to evaluate nutrient loading/flux and impacts (hypoxia) based on global change scenarios (climate, land management, sewage and wastewater management) from broad continental to regional (LMEs) scales; and hands-on development and scenario analysis using nutrient flow models for a selection of megacities represented by the participants at the training workshop.

 Expected learning achievements:

  • Understanding the science behind the nutrient flux modelling modules of the Toolbox;
  • Understanding of toolbox modelling requirements and scenario runs at continental scale to that of large marine ecosystems (LMEs);
  • Demonstration of Manila Bay model evaluations;
  • Use model for nutrient flows in the various megacities, scenario analysis and interpretation of results;
  • Understanding the linkages between the various tools and how these will be applied in decision support processes at both technical and policy levels.

Target audience:  Technical and policy professionals in relevant sectors of agriculture, urban planning, wastewater management who are charged with responsibilities for planning and management of investments in sustainable resource use and pollution control.  The trainees should be in positions of leadership who could serve as contact points for onward promotion and subsequent delivery of training in-country on the toolbox.  The trainees are to come from the major global regions;  Africa, Southeast Asia, Europe, North America, Latin America and small island states.    Trainees should be from countries that represent the ‘typical’ circumstance for the region being represented.

Category: Other

Since 1993 the IOC has conducted training courses on harmful microalgae. The purpose has been to improve the taxonomic and identification skills of the partici-pants for research purposes and for practical monitoring of harmful algal blooms.
The present course includes 80 hours of teaching and is divided into two parts, each consisting of 40 hours of teaching. The first part of the course is an internet teaching programme mainly for self-study of background material of the various groups of harmful algae, while the second part is a practical course in species identification.

Part I - Distant learning
The distant learning programme is using the UNESCO/IOC platform ‘Ocean Teacher’. The programme consists of 7 modules. There is an introductory text to each module and in some cases also technical documents with information on terminology, sample preparation etc.
Part II – Taxonomy and Species identification
This part of the course will focus on identification of harmful algal species, with particular reference to the ‘IOC Taxonomic Reference List on Toxic Plankton Algae’. The use of electron microscopy will be introduced, but practical exercises are not included.

Category: Other

IOC Training Course and Certification in Identification of Harmful Marine Algae (2015)

Category: Other

NPOMS-4 is a Workshop in a Series of IOC/WMO JCOMM PANGEA Workshops and Co-Sponsored by the IOC/WMO Data Buoy Cooperation Panel (DBCP) and NOAA’s Office of Climate Observation (OCO), and generously hosted by the Ocean Science and Technology (OST)-School, and the Korea Maritime and Ocean University (KMOU).

 

The Caribbean and its adjacent seas, including the Atlantic, have been the source region for 11 % of the world’s fatal tsunamis over history, with almost 100 tsunamis observed that have impacted 23 countries of this region. Caribbean nations must be prepared to face the dangers of tsunami from distant, regional and local sources. While many Caribbean Member countries continue to depend primarily on the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) for the warning advice to their National Tsunami Warning Centres, the reality of the dangers posed by local and regional sources does require Member States to: (i) identify and assess their tsunami risk; (ii) improve and expand the capabilities of their National Tsunami Warning Centres (NTWC)/Tsunami Warning Focal Points (TWFP) and Disaster Management Offices (NDMO) in order to respond to a tsunami in a timely and responsible manner to save lives; and (iii) engage in regional collaboration to build a strong warning and mitigation system.
In this context, the International Tsunami Information Center (Hawaii), in collaboration with the IOC ICG/CARIBE-EWS Secretariat, the Caribbean Tsunami Information Center (CTIC), and the Caribbean Tsunami Warning Program (CTWP) organise a Regional Tsunami Training Workshop on Strengthening Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) for Tsunami Warning and Emergency Response and the Development of the ICG/CARIBE-EWS PTWC New Enhanced Products to be held in Bridgetown, Barbados,18-22 November 2013. The training has the support of UNESCO and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) for Barbados and the OECS through the Enhancing Resilience to Reduce Vulnerability in the Caribbean (ERC) Project.
Participants are: a) members of the country’s national tsunami warning centre/tsunami warning focal point, national disaster management office, or geohazards agency; and b) responsible for and involved in tsunami warning and emergency response operations, and/or responsible for their country's Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). Participipating countries for this session are: Aruba, Barbados, Curaçao, Dominica, France (Guadeloupe, Martinique), Grenada, Guyana, Netherlands (Bonaire), St Lucia, St Vincent and The Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela.  

The Caribbean and its adjacent seas, including the Atlantic, have been the source region for 11 % of the world’s fatal tsunamis over history, with almost 100 tsunamis observed that have impacted 23 countries of this region. Member States of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and Other Coastal Hazards Warning System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (ICG/CARIBE) must be prepared to face the dangers of tsunamis from distant, regional and local sources. While many Caribbean Member countries continue to depend primarily on the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) for the warning advice to their National Tsunami Warning Centres, the reality of the dangers posed by local and regional sources does require Member States to: (i) identify and assess their tsunami risk; (ii) improve and expand the capabilities of their National Tsunami Warning Centres (NTWC)/Tsunami Warning Focal Points (TWFP) and Disaster Management Offices (NDMO) in order to respond to a tsunami in a timely and responsible manner to save lives; and (iii) engage in regional collaboration to build a strong warning and mitigation system.
This Regional Tsunami Training Workshop on Strengthening Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) for Tsunami Warning and Emergency Response and the Development of the ICG/CARIBE-EWS PTWC New Enhanced Products will be held in Mexico City, Mexico, 1-5 April 2014. The training that will be conducted in English, with simultaneous Spanish translation.
The training is being organized by the International Tsunami Information Center (Hawaii), in collaboration with the IOC ICG/CARIBE-EWS Secretariat, the Caribbean Tsunami Information Center (CTIC) and the Caribbean Tsunami Warning Program (CTWP), with the support of the United States Agency for International Development/Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance USAID/OFDA, UNESCO, the Government of Mexico through its Navy Secretary (Secretaria de Marina SEMAR), the Government of Barbados through its Department of Emergency Management and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Office for Barbados. 

The Caribbean and its adjacent seas, including the Atlantic, have been the source region for 11 % of the world’s fatal tsunamis over history, with almost 100 tsunamis observed that have impacted 23 countries of this region. Caribbean nations must be prepared to face the dangers of tsunami from distant, regional and local sources. While many Caribbean Member countries continue to depend primarily on the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) for the warning advice to their National Tsunami Warning Centres, the reality of the dangers posed by local and regional sources does require Member States to: (i) identify and assess their tsunami risk; (ii) improve and expand the capabilities of their National Tsunami Warning Centres (NTWC)/Tsunami Warning Focal Points (TWFP) and Disaster Management Offices (NDMO) in order to respond to a tsunami in a timely and responsible manner to save lives; and (iii) engage in regional collaboration to build a strong warning and mitigation system.

ITIC Training Programme Hawaii (ITP-HAWAII) 2011 - Tsunami Early Warning and Mitigation Systems

Within the framework of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and Other Coastal Hazards Warning System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (ICG/CARIBE-EWS), the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO, the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN) of the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez (UPRM) and the Caribbean Tsunami Warning Program (US NOAA/NWS) are organizing the “Fourth Training Course for Operators of Sea Level Stations in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions”, in Mayagüez, Puerto Rico, 3–7 November 2014.
Currently over 60 sea level stations in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions are contributing to the CARIBE EWS and are available to the existing Tsunami Warning Centres. In addition to fulfilling the requirements of tsunami services it is encouraged that the stations also meet the requirements of the Global Sea Level Observing System (GLOSS). The aim of this training course is to facilitate the sustainability of this observational system. The course has two main components: the first focusing on the installation and operation of the stations and the second on the quality control, archival and analysis of the sea level data. It is expected that all participants will also present a written and oral report on the status of sea level operations of their institution.

Tsunami Awareness course

North-eastern Atlantic, Mediterranean and connected seas Tsunami Information Centre

The Course provides an in-depth analysis of the legal, technical and scientific aspects of the implementation of the relevant provisions of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea on marine scientific research.