Topic outline

  • Overview

    NPOMS-4 is a workshop in a series of IOC/WMO JCOMM PANGEA workshops.

    NPOMS-4 was co-sponsored by the IOC/WMO Data Buoy Cooperation Panel (DBCP) and NOAA’s Office of Climate Observation (OCO), and generously hosted by the Ocean Science and Technology (OST)-School, and the Korea Maritime and Ocean University (KMOU). Theme of the workshop was "Application of Regional Ocean Observations for Increasing Societry's Understanding and Forecasting of Typhoons".

    The following sessions took place.

    • Session 1 : Reviews of Relevant Research Programs and Regional Studies
    • Session 2 : Technology of Ocean Data Buoys, Applying Ocean Observation to Typhoon Research and Forecasts
    • Session 3 : Understanding the Processes and Mechanisms of Typhoon-Ocean Interaction

    Website : http://jcomm.info/npoms-4

  • Session 1.1. Changes in Tropical Cyclone Season in Western North Pacific Associated to the Tropical Sea Surface Temperature

    Presenter

    Hyeong-Seog Kim, Korea Maritime and Ocean University


    Abstract

    The length of the active Tropical Cyclone (TC) season is highly dependent on its start date, which has large inter-annual variation. The variation of start TC season is closely associated with the sea surface temperature (SST) over the Indian Ocean (IO) and the eastern Pacific (EP). When the IO and EP SST's are warm in the winter and early-spring, anomalous downdraft and anti-cyclonic circulation are induced around the western North Pacific, resulting in the delay of start of the active TC season.


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  • Session 1.2. Shift in Tropical Cyclone Lifetime Maximum Intensity

    Presenter

    Doo-Sun Park, Seoul National University


    Abstract

    Enhanced Walker circulation and PNA-like wave propagation caused by La-Nina-like warming change dynamic conditions within the basin. Because of these changes, more tropical cyclones reach their maximum intensity closer to the East Asian continent, which leads to stronger landfall intensity, particularly, over the Northeast Asia. But over the Southeast Asia, because of genesis effect, landfall intensity has not been intensified.

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  • Session 1.3. DBCP Activities and its Benefits to the Region

    Presenter

    Champika Gallage, DBCP Technical Coordinator, JCOMMOPS


    Abstract

    DBCP operates as an official joint body of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC). Our goal is to provide international coordination and assistance within the meteorological and oceanographic communities who provide observations from data buoys as well as who use observations from data buoys. We achieve our goals by monitoring coordinating and assisting the international community. This helps to improve global forecasts of weather and ocean conditions, and also contribute to climate study and oceanographic research.


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  • Sessiont 1.4. Thailand National Report

    Presenter

    Anucha Srerurngla, Thai Meteorological Department


    Abstract

    Thailand is located in the tropical area. The climate of Thailand may be divided into three seasons and under the influence of monsoon wind. Rainy or southwest monsoon usually starts in mid-May and ends in mid-October, winter or northeast monsoon season normally starts in mid-October and ends in mid-February and summer or pre-monsoon season if from mid-February to mid-May. Statistically, tropical cyclone affecting Thailand usually moves from the western North Pacific Ocean or the South China Sea.
    Introduction to climate, numerical models and marine meteorological observations in Thailand.


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  • Session 1.5. The Assessment of Typhoon Hazards at Regional-Scales in the Pacific Regions with Downscaling Numerical Experiments

    Presenter

    Tetsuya Takemi, DPRI, Kyoto University


    Abstract

    Accurate representation of the intensity, track, and translation speed of typhoons in downscaling experiments is desirable for quantitative assessments of impacts on natural hazards at regional-scales. Past extreme cases provide basic guidance for disaster prevention and mitigation not only under the current climate condition but also under global warming through considering a worst-case scenario among various levels of natural hazards and risks. Close collaboration between meteorologist and users (engineers, national/local government officials, operational sectors, etc.) is important for impact assessment studies.


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  • Session 1.6. A Vison of NPOMS Training Center in DBCP

    Presenter

    Byung-Gul Lee, Jeju National University


    Abstract

    There are two modalities of the DBCP capacity building program. One is the workshop and the other is the training center. Within the workshop, we exchange information, new ideas, special techniques and so on. But the capacity building workshops are not held in developing countries. So the special training program for people in developing countries who are interested in data buoy or buoy data was developed as training centers. In 2015, the pilot project ‘NPOMS training center’ was implemented at Busan National University.

    • Session 1.7. Ocean and Climate

      Abstract

      Ocean-Climate is an international multi-stakeholder collaborative platform consisting of scientific organizations, universities, research institutions, environmental and companies associations, foundations and science centers, international private foundations and public institutions. include the Ocean in the future climate regime and contribute to a successful outcome of the COP21 negotiations. We need to develop scientific knowledge of the links between Ocean and Climate and may we raise awareness among the public and private decision-makers of the Ocean and Climate concerns.


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      Meterials

      video_19.MOV

    • Session 2.1. The 1st Ever Successful Flight of an Unmanned Aircraft Deployed from a Manned Aircraft Into a Major Hurricane (Edouard , 2014)

      Presenter

      Joseph Cione, NOAA Hurricane Research


      Abstract


      The Coyote UAS, NOAA’s P3 aircraft, in conjunction with new observing technologies (such as unmanned aircraft systems) is used to significantly enhance data coverage within critically important, sparsely-sampled regions of the tropical cyclone. These observations are improving basic understanding, situational awareness and ultimately, hurricane intensity forecast performance through enhanced observations.


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    • Session 2.2. WIGOS Prep-Operational Phase (2016-2019) following WMO 17th Congress Decisions

      Presenter

      Etienne Charpentier, WMO


      Abstract

      The WMO Integrated Global Observing System (WIGOS) is an over-arching framework for the coordination and evolution of WMO observing systems and for contributions of WMO to co-sponsored observing systems. It’s an evolution from the WWW (weather) centric GOS to a multi-disciplinary framework supporting Weather, Water & Climate. The implementation of the global WIGOS framework (2012-2015) has made substantial progress. The pre-operational phase will focus on developing guidance material, deployment and enhancement of OSCAR (WIGOS metadata), development of a WIGOS Data Quality Monitoring System and regional and national activities such as establishment of regional WIGOS centers, regional/sub-regional workshops and training events, regional/sub-regional workshops and training events. JCOMM and DBCP fully engaged in WIGOS implementation.


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    • Session 2.3. DMH Early Warning System and Case Study of KOMEN cyclone

      Presenter

      Thandar Aye, Department of Meteorology and Hydrologoy Myanmar

      Abstract

      Department of Meteorology and Hydrology (DMH) are routine observation and analysis of meteorological phenomena and providing weather information and early warning system for the general public. Most important works are mitigation and prevention of natural disasters. Also provides meteorological and hydrological information for the public, shipping and aviation. Tasks and services are performed as real time and continuously for 24 hours every day in Naypyitaw (Headquarter), Mingaladon aviation and Yangon Station. Effort to improve the cyclonic storm detection and warning system, flood as well as upgrading of telecommunication system, since telecommunication is essential and like a backbone of every meteorological and hydrological activities.


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    • Session 2.4. An Update on the Barometer Drifter, A Cost Effective Technology for Providing Sea Level Pressure Observations, and Addressing Multiple Requirements

      Presenter

      Etienne Charpentier, WMO


      Abstract

      Sea Level Pressure is an Essential Climate Variable (ECV), which cannot be observed adequately from space. SLP observations allow description of the geostrophic, barotropic global atmospheric circulation, which accounts for the largest part of the atmospheric circulation and used by scientists for computation of trends, climate model diagnostic and constructing climate indices. Isolated SLP measurements can play an important role in synoptic forecasting especially when they differ from model outputs. Drifter is one of the available technologies for measuring SLP which is cost effective. Lagrangian drifters (SVP) used for surface velocity and SST. SVPB has barometer installed on SVP drifter and provide high temporal resolution SLP observations (1h). It costs USD 6,000,000 to operate drifter network (1250 units, incl. 50% SVPBs) and cost of barometers is 10% of that total cost.


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    • Session 2.5. Observations of Hurricane Sandy from a Glider Mounted Current Profiler

      Presenter

      Travis Miles, Rutgers University


      Abstract

      dynamics of hurricane Sandy.


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    • Session 2.6. Targeted in-situ Tropical Cyclone Observations from Air-deployed Drifters

      Presenter

      Luca Centurioni, Scripps Institution of Oceanography


      Abstract

      An “operational” system for targeted C-130 air deployments of various GDP drifters exists. “High quality” measurements of Pa, SST, sea-level wind velocity and T(z=150m) through tropical cyclones can be made. Meteorological research and operational hurricane monitoring aircraft cannot deploy these large packages. New “operational” mini system for acquisition tropical cyclone surface and subsurface data is in development at SIO.


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    • Session 2.7. Ocean Data Services at Indian National Centre for Ocean Information Services

      Presenter

      Murty Pudipeddi, INCOIS


      Abstract

      India has been playing key role in implementation of the Ocean Observation System in the Indian Ocean region. INCOIS has been designated as the National Oceanographic Data Centre by the International Oceanographic Data Exchange Programme (IODE) of International Oceanographic Commission (IOC). Ocean observing systems in the Indian ocean region and their applications to weather prediction and early cyclone warning are introduced.


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    • Session 2.8. Oceanic Observation and Typhoon Forecast in CMA

      Presenter

      Xiaoxia Li, CMA


      Abstract

      Introduce about oceanic observation and typhoon forecast in CMA. Oceanic observations in CMA mainly rely on moored buoys, the coastal-marine Automated Weather Station (AWS), shipping AWS, weather radars, wind profiler radars, GNSS/MET stations, synthesized experiment bases, satellites and so on. And typhoon forecast…………


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    • Session 2.9. Operational Wave and Storm Surge Forecasting System in KMA

      Presenter

      Sung Hyup You, KMA


      Abstract

      Typhoon disaster is the most serious problem in Korea. Particularly, storm surge and high wave induced by typhoon cause much damage to coastal areas of Korea. So KMA operate various Marine Observations Network instruments from near coastal to high sea and plan to expand their marine observation network around the Korean Peninsula until 2017. Also KMA operate wave/storm surges forecasting system using NWP model based on Unified Model(UM).


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    • Session 3.1. Stratified Coastal Ocean Interactions with Tropical Cyclones

      Presenter

      Scott Glenn, Rutgers University


      Abstract

      There are several regional-scale observation networks in the Mid-Atlantic Bight such as the Northeast U.S. Real-Time Satellite Ground Stations, High Frequency Radar Network, Glider Network and Weather Network. These tools are used to look at the ocean impact and hurricane intensity. But compared with the accurate track forecasting, as you can see in case of hurricane Irene and super-typhoon Muifa, intensity forecasting in coastal area remains a big gap in storm science because of strong stratification and coastal response.


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    • Session 3.2. Roles of Banda Sea to air-sea interaction over Indonesia, the existing oceanographic measurements and future plans of oceanographic observatories in the sea

      Presenter

      Gerry Giliant Salamena, LIPI


      Abstract

      Introduce roles of Banda Sea to air-sea interaction over Indonesia and oceanographic measurements in the sea. There are two impacts from the ocean and atmospheric dynamics in Banda Sea. First, dynamics of sea-air interaction in Banda Sea with the involvement of Indonesian Through Flow (ITF) and second, coastal hazards for small islands around Banda Sea.


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    • Sesseion 3.3. Novel Air-sea and Ocean Observations Collected During Hurricane Edouard (2014)

      Presenter

      Joseph Cione, NOAA Hurricane Research


      Abstract

      To provide a comprehensive data set for evaluating high-resolution coupled air-sea models, the experiment was conducted in 2014 in Hurricane Edouard, in which five different aircraft participated (NOAA P-3s(2), NOAA GIV, NASA GlobalHawk and Raytheon Coyote).


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    • Session 3.4. Changes in ocean subsurface environment to suppress tropical cyclone intensification under global warming

      Presenter

      I.I. Lin, NTU Via VTC


      Abstract

      Under global warming, subsurface ocean warms SLOWER than surface ocean, thus subsurface ocean temperature gradient sharpens (stratification increase), based on 22 CMIP5 Ocean models. This is found in both the main development regions (MDRs) of Western North Pacific and North Atlantic. This sharpening increases tropical cyclone (TC) – ocean coupling (cooling) effect under global warming, thus is a previously undiscovered additional OFFSET to restrain TC intensification under global warming. It appears the situation may not be as pessimistic, as predicted by the uncoupled projections.


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