Topic outline

  • General

    INTRODUCTION

    Among many coastal countries Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) has become the preferred management approach to address increasing conflicts among multiple uses of coastal and marine areas, including their contiguous exclusive economic zones (EEZs). Over the next decade another 30 countries, including the coastal countries of the European Union (EU) and USA, will develop and approve marine spatial plans that will cover about a third of the surface area of the world’s EEZs. IOC-UNESCO has provided guidance and training to many of these MSP initiatives and is recognized as the leading international organization on MSP issues.
    A common theme underpinning these concepts is the importance of ecosystem-based approaches to manage human uses and sustain ecosystem services while adapting to the impacts of climate change. The new challenges of climate variability and change, alongside the other existing drivers that cause depletion and degradation within coastal and marine ecosystems, increases the urgency and the need to scale up these efforts at national and regional scales. There is now a need to support adaptive ecosystem-management and governance that is informed by and evolves through ongoing learning and adaptive processes, to help increase the resilience and well-being of societies dependent on marine goods and services.


    In the regional context, many initiatives at the scale of Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs) are leading activities on improving our understanding of coastal and marine systems by developing robust databases and information products to support coastal and marine governance.
    In Africa, the LME projects in Agulhas-Somali, Benguela and Canary Current are good examples of the work that LME practitioners are currently undertaking on coastal and marine governance. Likewise, the African Union, through the 2050 African Integrated Marine Strategy, also aims to achieve a comprehensive and effective plan to understand the existing and future challenges with regards to socio-economic development and coastal and marine ecosystems.


    OBJECTIVES

    - Strengthening the global and regional network of partners to enhance ecosystem-based management and to provide support for integrated coastal area management and MSP through the development of coastal and marine web atlases. Building on existing initiatives in Africa, Caribbean and Latin America. (South-South).


    - Development of decision support tools to increase synergies to implement the methodological concepts for both ICAM and MSP, and to facilitate communication, dissemination, and outreach activities.


    - Development of capacities and partnership building through twinning and learning exchanges, workshops, and training in the context of OceanTeacher and the International Coastal Atlas Network ICAN-IODE Project.

    COURSE ORGANISERS

    Alejandro Iglesias Campos
    IOC-UNESCO | Marine Policy and Regional Coordination Section

    Lucy Scott
    OceanTeacher Global Academy | RTC South Africa
     
    Claudia Delgado
    Training Coordinator UNESCO/IOC Project Office for IODE

    This course is a joint activity of IOC/MPR, ICAN, and the OTGA (IODE), and is the first course hosted by a regional training centre (RTC) of the OceanTeacher Global Academy.

    The training course will be held back to back with CoastGIS 2015 and ICAN7

    DATES: 20-22 April 2015

    COURSE AGENDA AND LOCAL LOGISTICAL INFORMATION

  • Topic 1

    PRE-COURSE work and preparation

    Welcome to the 2015 Marine Spatial Planning Training Course.

    In preparation for the course, we would like you to complete the following brief tasks:

    1. Familiarise yourself with the course agenda

    2. Review the local logistical information document, and plan your route from the airport to your accommodation or the meeting venue as directed.

    3. Visit the Quantum GIS website

    Download and Install QGIS onto the laptop that you'll be bringing to the course. It will be used for one of the practical exercises.

    4. Update or create (register) your personal record on OceanExpert. This will be needed to link your profile to the course.

    5. Review the recommended reading list (1-5 below, and the IOC guide provided in the link) and look at the additional reading lists if you have time.

    IOC Guidelines and websites:
    1) Handbook for measuring the progress and outcomes of integrated coastal and ocean management (English and Spanish)
     
    2) Marine spatial planning: a step-by-step approach towards ecosystem-based management (English and Spanish)
     
    3) A guide to evaluating marine spatial plans (English)
     
    4) Visions for a sea change - Report of the First International Workshop on MSP (English)
     
    5) Directory of Atmospheric, hydrographic and biological datasets for the Canary Current Large Marine Ecosystem (English)
     
    IOC Websites
     
    IOC - MSP Initiative
    TWAP - LME and Open Ocean components
    The Global Ocean Observing System
     
    Additional publications

    Recommended readings on data, information and tools
     

    A copy of the UNESCO/Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commmission's Guide to "Marine Spatial Planning: A step-by-step approach toward ecosystem-based management" can be downloaded by clicking the icon below.

    Further Reading:

    Glossary: 1Files: 4
  • Concepts, policies, international experiences and best practices on MSP

    by Charles Ehler, IOC-UNESCO Senior Consultant

    File: 1
  • Mapping and assessing the state of coastal/marine ecosystems (and their services) – Linkages with the EU Marine Policies

    by Andrus Meiner, European Environment Agency


    OBJECTIVES
    This presentation provides a general overview of the work done by the EEA on coastal and marine environment, the importance of the EEA reporting on the state of the coastal and marine environment and the specific exercices on mapping and assessing coastal and marine ecosystems and their services in the context of the implementation of the MSFD and the MSPFD.


    EXPECTED OUTCOMES
    - Clear understanding of the legal framework at European scale
    - General overview of the evolution of the State of Europe’s coasts and seas.
    - Detailed overview on the tasks dedicated to mapping and assessing coastal and marine ecosystem services.
    - Data and information implications in the implementation process of the MSFD and the MSPFD in Europe (including EU and non-EU countries).

    DESCRIPTION
    Presentation will review current state-of-art in Europe regarding ecosystem mapping and assessment. It will focus on assessment at European level and will explain the main policy drivers and methodological approaches that complement the ecosystem assessments at individual country level. While current ecosystem analysis framework deals with all ecosystem types, the presentation will explore specifically how coastal and marine ecosystems are addressed. The role of ecosystem condition as basis for ecosystem services supply will be explained, but specific mapping of ecosystem services will not be discussed due to lack of time. Attempt is made to show how the recent European legislation on maritime spatial planning can benefit from formation of ecosystem mapping and assessment in order to comply with general principles of ecosystem based management approach.

    REFERENCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS (In English, Spanish and French)

    File: 1
  • Methodologies for marine socio-economic analysis and cumulative impacts in Large Marine Ecosystems

    by Alejandro Iglesias-Campos, IOC-UNESCO

    BACKGROUND
    The global coastal ocean is divided into 66 Large Marine Ecosystems, which are natural regions of coastal ocean space encompassing waters from river basins and estuaries to the seaward boundaries of continental shelves and margins of coastal currents and water masses. LMEs cover 200,000 km2 or more and their natural boundaries are based on four ecological criteria: bathymetry, hydrography, productivity, and trophically-related populations.

    OBJECTIVES
    This presentation will provide a general overview of the work done by IOC-UNESCO on gathering data and information on the impact of natural and anthropogenic stressors on large marine ecosystems and the sustainable production of ecosystem services, as well as the vulnerability of humans to such changes. In brief, human activities have associated stressors that impact natural systems and this in turn affects the delivery (and value) of ecosystem services to people.

    EXPECTED OUTCOMES
    - Clear understanding on data and information needs for coastal and marine management.
    - Overview of data availability at regional and LME level.
    - Examples of coastal and marine indicators to monitor the state of the environment at LME level.
    - Example of use of this information in reporting, management and planning processes.

    DESCRIPTION OF YOUR PRESENTATION
    This presentation will provide a general overview of the work done in the context of the Transboundary Water Assessment Programme (TWAP) in which IOC-UNESCO is leading the large marine ecosystem (LMEs) component on assessing the status and changing condition of LMEs resulting from human and natural causes which will allow the GEF, policy makers and international organizations to set science-based priorities for financial resources allocation and institutional arrangements for periodic future assessments.

    REFERENCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS (In English, Spanish and French)

    • Large Marine Ecosystem – Reporting available at: http://lme.edc.uri.edu/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=193&Itemid=55
    • B. S. Halpern, Longo, C., Lowndes, J. S. Stewart, Best, B. D., Frazier, M., Katona, S. K., Kleisner, K. M., Rosenberg, A. A., Scarborough, C., and Selig, E. R., “Patterns and emergingtrends in global ocean health”, PLoS ONE, vol. in press, 2015.
    • B. S. Halpern and Fujita, R., “Assumptions, challenges, and future directions in cumulative impact analysis”, Ecosphere, vol. 4, 2014.
    • K. V. Robinson, Pinkerton, M. H., Hall, J. A., and Hosie, G. H., “Continuous Plankton Recorder sampling between New Zealand and the Ross Sea, 2006–2013”, 128, 2014.
    • K. Lavender Law, Morét-Ferguson, S. E., Goodwin, D. S., Zettler, E. R., DeForce, E., Kukulka, T., and Proskurowski, G., “Distribution of Surface Plastic Debris in the Eastern Pacific Ocean from an 11-Year Data Set”, Environmental Science & TechnologyEnvironmental Science & Technology, vol. 48, no. 9, pp. 4732 - 4738, 2014.
    • C. S. Kwan, Takada, H., Boonyatumanond, R., Kato, Y., Mizukawa, K., Ito, M., Dung, L. Q., zakaria, M. P., and Santiago, E. C., “Historical occurrences of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polychlorinated biphenyls in Manila Bay, Philippines, and in the upper Gulf of Thailand”, Science of the Total Environment, vol. 470-471, pp. 427-437, 2014.
    • F. Xie, Li, J., Tian, W., Li, Y., and Feng, J., “Indo-Pacific Warm Pool Area Expansion, Modoki Activity, and Tropical Cold-Point Tropopause Temperature Variations”, Sci. Rep., vol. 4, 2014.
    • R. van Hooidonk, Maynard, J. Allen, Manzello, D., and Planes, S., “Opposite latitudinal gradients in projected ocean acidification and bleaching impacts on coral reefs”, Global Change Biology, vol. 20, pp. 103–112, 2014.
    • GESAMP Task Team, “Pollution in the Open Oceans 2009-2013”, 2014.
    • D. Vousden and Stapley, J., “Evolving new governance approaches for the Agulhas and Somali Current Large Marine Ecosystems through dynamic management strategies and partnerships”, Environmental Development , vol. 7, pp. 32-45, 2013
    • R. A. Watson, Cheung, W. W. L., Anticamara, J. A., Sumaila, R. U., Zeller, D., and Pauly, D., “Global marine yield halved as fishing intensity redoubles”, Fish and Fisheries, vol. 14, pp. 493–503, 2013.
    • R. Mahon, Cooke, A., Fanning, L., and McConney, P., “Governance arrangements for marine ecosystems of the Wider Caribbean Region”, CERMES Technical Report No 60, 2013.
    • T. F. Stocker, Qin, D., Plattner, G. - K., Tignor, M., Allen, S. K., Boschung, J., Nauels, A., and Xia, Y., IPCC:2013 Climate Change 2013: The physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental . Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press, 2013, p. 1535.
    • T. F. Stocker, Qin, D., Plattner, G. - K., Tignor, M., Allen, S. K., Boschung, J., Nauels, A., Xia, Y., Bex, V., and Midgley, P. M., “IPCC, 2013: Summary for Policymakers”, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA, 2013.
    • M. Edwards, Beaugrand, G., Helaouët, P., Alheit, J., and Coombs, S., “Marine Ecosystem Response to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation”, PLoS ONE, vol. 8, no. 2, 2013.
    • K. Mizukawa, Takada, H., Ito, M., Geok, Y. B., Hosoda, J., Yama**a, R., Saha, M., Suzuki, S., Miguez, C., Frias, J. O., Antunes, J. C., Sobral, P., Santos, I., Micaelo, C., and Ferreira, A. M., “Monitoring of a wide range of organic micropollutants on the Portuguese coast using plastic resin pellets”, Marine Pollution Bulletin, vol. 70, pp. 296-302, 2013.
    • L. Bopp, Resplandy, L., Orr, J. C., Doney, S. C., Dunne, J. P., Gehlen, M., Halloran, P., Heinze, C., Ilyina, T., Seferian, R., Tjiputra, J., and Vichi, M., “Multiple stressors of ocean ecosystems in the 21st century: projections with CMIP5 models”, Biogeosciences, vol. 10, pp. 6225–6245, 2013.
    • IGBP, IOC, and SCOR, “Ocean Acidification Summary for Policymakers”, in Third Symposium on the Ocean in a High-CO2 World, Stockholm, Sweden., 2013.
    • G. Siedler, Grieffies, S., Gould, J., and Church, J., Ocean Circulation and Climate, 2nd Edition. A 21st century perspective. Academic Press, 2013, p. 904.
    • M. C. Goldstein, Titmus, A. J., and Ford, M., “Scales of spatial heterogeneity of plastic marine debris in the northeast Pacific ocean”, PLoS ONE, vol. 8, no. 11, 2013.
    • C. S. Kwan, Takada, H. ;, Mizukawa, K., Saha, M., Rinawati, and Santiago, E. C., “Sedimentary PBDEs in urban areas of tropical Asian countries.”, Marine Pollution Bulletin, vol. 76, pp. 95-105, 2013.
    File: 1
  • MSP at the urban scale in South Africa

    by Susan Taljaard, CSIR

    BACKGROUND
    MSP at local level

    OBJECTIVES
    This presentation will focus on MSP at the urban (local) scale. It will highlight key challenges for MSP at this scale and demonstrate practical ways in which to address some of these through using a broader integrated coastal management framework.

    EXPECTED OUTCOMES
    - Identify main challenges for MSP implementation at urban (local) scale
    - Potential ways in which to address these challenges, e.g. through a broader integrated coastal management framework
    - Demonstration using case study/ies

    DESCRIPTION OF YOUR PRESENTATION
    The presentation provides the legal context for urban (local) scale MSP and highlights some of the key challenges. It then illustrates how some of these challenges can be addressed by incorporating MSP into a broader integrated coastal management framework. Local case study/ies will be used to demonstrate the practicality and applicability of this approach.


    REFERENCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS (In English, Spanish and French)

    File: 1
  • SWOT framework for describing the coastal and marine environment at regional scale (Africa, Caribbean and Latin American Pacific) and MSP needs

    BACKGROUND
    The majority of participants have been involved in regional projects such as the African Marine Atlas and the Southeast Pacific Data and Information to support coastal management (SPINCAM), or they are currently developing tasks related to data and information development.

    OBJECTIVES
    This practical exercise will help all participants to interact and to share experiences from their own regions and countries.

    EXPECTED OUTCOMES
    - Identification of similarities and differences amongst each region
    - Identification of shared needs in all regions
    - Identification of specific hot spots in each region
    - Identification of data and information needs per region
    - Etc

    DESCRIPTION

    Four regional groups:
    - Group 1: Southeast Pacific and Caribbean,
    - Group 2: Western Africa
    - Group 3: Eastern Africa
    - Group 4: Mediterranean.
    Each group will discuss and describe the status of their coastal and marine environment, existing coastal and marine atlases, existing management plans and regional needs by using a SWAT framework.
    Paper A0/1 and markers will be distributed.
    Each group will later present their own SWAT to facilitate a general discussion amongst all participants.

  • Introduction to the MSP Step-by-step approach

    each step to be presented by Charles Ehler; specific lessons learnt introduced by specific experts and general discussion.

    BACKGROUND
    During the last decade, IOC-UNESCO through the collaboration with Charles Ehler and other key experts have developed multiple methodological publications on integrated coastal area management and marine spatial planning by identifying the key steps of the planning process in order to facilitate its implementation.

    OBJECTIVES
    This presentation will introduce the methodological aspects in relation to the step-by-step ecosystem-based management approach that will serve during the rest of the day as a reference to discuss the data and information needs in each of the identified steps.

    DESCRIPTION
    During recent years, marine spatial planning has been the focus of considerable interest around the world, the European Union, North America, Australia and now the African Union are attempting to define the scope and nature of marine spatial planning. The IOC-UNESCO guide published in 2009 set the step-by-step approach for marine spatial planning toward ecosystem-based management in order to understand the concepts of MSP and the consecutive steps and tasks of setting up a successful marine spatial planning initiative that can help achieving ecosystem-based management.

    REFERENCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS (In English, Spanish and French)

    1. Ehler, Charles; Douvere, Fanny. Marine spatial planning: a step-by-step approach toward ecosystem-based management: http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0018/001865/186559e.pdf
    2. Planificación espacial marina: una guía paso a paso hacia la gestión ecosistémica: http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0018/001865/186559s.pdf
    3. IOC. Manuals and guides; 53
    4. Publ: 2009; 2013; 99 p., illus., maps*; IOC/2009/MG/53.
    File: 1
  • Step 1: Establishing Authority

    by Alejandro Iglesias-Campos

    BACKGROUND
    MSP guidelines and development of coastal and marine web atlases to support coastal and marine management and planning

    OBJECTIVES
    Identify data and information needs for each of the MSP step approach by providing lessons learnt from other projects and planning initiatives.

    EXPECTED OUTCOMES
    - Identifying the need of marine spatial planning
    - Establishing the appropriate authority to plan and to implement MSP

    DESCRIPTION
    This presentation will provide a preliminary list of specific problems that could be solved through marine spatial planning in order to decide what kind of authority is needed for developing marine spatial planning in a specific location and time.

    REFERENCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS (In English, Spanish and French)

    1. Lawrence D., Kenchington R., and Woodley S. 2002. The Great Barrier Reef: Finding the Right Balance. Melbourne University Press, Victoria, Australia
    2. The Marine and Coastal Access Bill. For more information, see: (http://www.defra.gov.uk/marine/legislation/index.htm)
    3. The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act, 1975. For more information, see: http://www.gbrmpa.gov.au/
    4. Oceans Act 2008. Common-wealth of Massachusetts. United States of America. Available at: (http://www.mass.gov/?pageID=eoeeasubtopic&L=3&L0=Home&L1=Ocean+%26+Coastal+Management&L2=Massachusetts+Ocean+Plan&sid=Eoeea
    File: 1
  • Step 2: Obtaining Financial Support

    Introductory presentation by Charles Ehler (PPT)
    Presentation by Andrus Meiner and Ned Dwyer

    BACKGROUND
    MSP guidelines and development of coastal and marine web atlases to support coastal and marine management and planning
    OBJECTIVES
    Identify data and information needs for each of the MSP step approach by providing lessons learnt from other projects and planning initiatives.

    EXPECTED OUTCOMES
    - Identify alternative financing mechanisms
    - Defining the feasibility of alternative funding mechanisms

    DESCRIPTION OF YOUR PRESENTATION
    The framework within which funding requirements exist will be explained. Moreover the approaches to setting up and implementing MSP in a transboundary context will be outlined, with particular reference to the European Directive on MSP. Furthermore specific examples of funding mechanisms that have been applied in different nation States around the world will be given. These include China where user fees are applied to support MSP and the revenues are shared between national and regional government, the Netherlands where a number of national ministries support the implementation from their operational budgets and the Seychelles where funding to initiate an MSP process is provided by a number of international bodies.

    REFERENCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS (In English, Spanish and French)

    1. Li, H., 2006. The impacts and implications of the legal framework for sea use planning and management in China. Ocean & Coastal Management. 49: 717-726.
    2. UNESCO, 2006, Report of the First International Workshop on Marine Spatial Planning – Visions for a SEA CHANGE, http://www.belspo.be/belspo/northsea/publ/sea%20change%20vision%20.pdf
    3. http://www.seychellesmarinespatialplanning.com/
    4. Interdepartmental Directors’ Consultative Committee North Sea, 2005, Integrated Management Plan for the North Sea 2015, http://www.zeeinzicht.nl/docsN2000/IBN2015%20%28EN%29.pdf
    File: 1
  • STEP 3 – Organizing the process through pre-planning

    Introductory presentation by Charles Ehler
    Presentation by Lucy Scott and Alejandro Iglesias


    BACKGROUND
    MSP guidelines and development of coastal and marine web atlases to support coastal and marine management and planning
    OBJECTIVES
    Identify data and information needs for each of the MSP step approach by providing lessons learnt from other projects and planning initiatives.

    EXPECTED OUTCOMES
    - Organization of the MSP Team
    - How to develop the work plan
    - Definition of the boundaries and timeframe
    - Definition of principles, goals and objectives
    - Identification of risks and developing contingency plans

    DESCRIPTION
    This presentation will provide a general overview on how the MSP teams in charge of developing the work plan and the outputs of planning could be organized. The Pre-planning is one of the most important steps of this approach because it will define the boundaries and time framework for analysis and management, as well as to set the principles of the MSP and the goals to accomplish.

    REFERENCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS

    File: 1
  • Sep 4: Stakeholder's Participation

    Introductory presentation by Charles Ehler
    Presentation by Kathrin Kopke and Marcia Berman

    BACKGROUND
    MSP guidelines and development of coastal and marine web atlases to support coastal and marine management and planning

    OBJECTIVES
    Identify data and information needs for each of the MSP step approach by providing lessons learnt from other projects and planning initiatives.

    EXPECTED OUTCOMES
    - Who should be involved in the MSP
    - When to involve the stakeholders
    - How to involve stakeholders

    DESCRIPTION
    Providing Context - Why do we need to involve Stakeholder?

    • Social–ecological links between marine ecosystem illustrated via Zanzibar case-study, emphasising substantial local knowledge of stakeholders and that knowledge is essential if you want to do MSP.
    • Multiple users operate in the marine environment in context with current activities in South Africa, referencing Operation Phakisa and its objective to unlock South Africa’s 'blue economy‘. This means more users and more intensive use of resources and has been recognised by SA government engaging stakeholders and future plans to use MSP in identified regions.


    MSP and challenges – an Irish perspective of transferable issues

    • Some challenges can be addressed at the onset using stakeholder engagement throughout the MSP process and via transboundary stakeholder engagement.
    • Stakeholder engagement illustrated through project examples of PISCES and TPEA
    • Highlight who, how and when stakeholders were involved during PISCES and TPEA project
    • Stakeholder engagement lessons learned from those projects

    REFERENCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS

    File: 1
  • Step 5: Analysing Current Conditions – Data, Information, GIS and Geo Tools

    LESSONS: Anja Kreiner and Harrison Onganda (African Marine Atlas)

    BACKGROUND
    MSP guidelines and development of coastal and marine web atlases to support coastal and marine management and planning

    OBJECTIVES
    Identify data and information needs for each of the MSP step approach by providing lessons learnt from other projects and planning initiatives. Including the African Union Integrated Maritime Strategy 2050.

    EXPECTED OUTCOMES
    In the context of the African Union Integrated Maritime Strategy 2050:
    - Collection of data and information on ecological, environmental and oceanographic conditions.
    - Collection of mapping information on human activities
    - Identification of current conflicts and compatibilities.

    DESCRIPTION OF PRESENTATION
    This presentation will give a brief overview on steps involved in the development of the African Coastal and Marine Atlas and examples of data layers available (for Namibia). Other relevant national projects will be discussed briefly and examples of available information relevant to MSP will be shown. Lessons learned from other projects will be shared.”

    REFERENCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS (In English, Spanish and French)
    Please visit the Namibia National Oceanographic Data Centre – National Marine information and Research Centre: http://www.nodc-namibia.org/en/

    File: 1
  • Step 6: Defining Future Conditions – Scenario Building


    LESSONS: Ned Dwyer and Andrus Meiner (ICAN)

    BACKGROUND
    MSP guidelines and development of coastal and marine web atlases to support coastal and marine management and planning

    OBJECTIVES
    Identify data and information needs for each of the MSP step approach by providing lessons learnt from other projects and planning initiatives.

    EXPECTED OUTCOMES
    - Current trends in the spatial and temporal needs of existing human activities.
    - Estimating spatial and temporal requirements for new demands of ocean space
    - Possible alternative futures
    - Selection of preferred spatial sea use scenario

    DESCRIPTION OF PRESENTATION
    The Gaufre project is an excellent example of how alternative futures were developed. The project proposed an optimal space use planning for the Belgian part of the North Sea. As part of the process a number of different visions of the future use of the North Sea were conceived. All of these visions were developed in the light of some fixed constraints (e.g. existing shipping lanes, the necessity of dredging) but also in relation to specific drivers namely well-being, ecology/landscape and economy. The constraints and drivers will be described and the different visions will be presented as well as some of the specific (and conflicting) scenarios developed in order to highlight that alternative futures are possible and that there are advantages and disadvantages in each. Ultimately the preferred future may be a compromise between different scenarios or it may be the scenario which decision makers believe to be the one that reflects best their priorities.

    REFERENCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS

    File: 1
  • Step 7: Preparing the Management Plan

    by Charles Ehler and Alejandro Iglesias-Campos (IOC)

    BACKGROUND
    MSP guidelines and development of coastal and marine web atlases to support coastal and marine management and planning

    OBJECTIVES
    Identify data and information needs for each of the MSP step approach by providing lessons learnt from other projects and planning initiatives.
    EXPECTED OUTCOMES
    - Management measures and criteria for selecting marine spatial management measures
    - Development of zoning plan
    - The Spatial Management Plan development process
    - Implementation of the Spatial Management Plan

    DESCRIPTION OF PRESENTATION
    This presentation will describe the expected outputs of two steps dedicated to preparing and approving the spatial management plan, by identifying alternative management measures and the development of a comprehensive management plan, including the zoning plan, which should identify when, where and how goals and objectives will be met. And the step on implementing and enforcing the spatial management plan which clearly identify the actions required to implement, ensure compliance with and enforce the spatial management plan.

    REFERENCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS

    File: 1
  • Step 8: Implementation, Compliance & Enforcement

    By Charles Ehler and Alejandro Iglesias-Campos (IOC)

    Please see Contents and Resources under Step 7 above

  • Step 9: Performance Monitoring & Evaluation


    By Charles Ehler and Alejandro Iglesias-Campos (IOC)


    BACKGROUND
    MSP guidelines and development of coastal and marine web atlases to support coastal and marine management and planning

    OBJECTIVES
    Identify data and information needs for each of the MSP step approach by providing lessons learnt from other projects and planning initiatives.

    EXPECTED OUTCOMES
    - How to manage the monitoring programme
    - Identification of performance indicators
    - Determining baseline data and information on indicators
    - Evaluation and report of monitoring

    DESCRIPTION OF PRESENTATION
    The step 9 on monitoring and evaluating performance is crucial for the audience of this training course, by the design of a monitoring system to measure indicators of the performance of MSP, as well as the needed information that will be used for evaluation and to prepare the periodic reports for decision makers, stakeholders and the public about the performance of the marine spatial management plan.

    REFERENCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS

    Also see Contents and Resources under Step 7 above

  • Step 10: Adaptation


    LESSONS: Adapting the Management Plan by Charles Ehler (IOC)

    BACKGROUND
    MSP guidelines and development of coastal and marine web atlases to support coastal and marine management and planning

    OBJECTIVES
    Identify data and information needs for each of the MSP step approach by providing lessons learnt from other projects and planning initiatives.

    EXPECTED OUTCOMES
    - Options to reconsider or redesign the existing MSP programme
    - Identification of applied research needs and how to integrate it
    - Evaluation of existing MSP plans

    DESCRIPTION OF PRESENTATION
    This presentation will provide a general overview on the needs of adaptation of the spatial management process, by proposing an adaptive management through the incorporation of a formal learning process into management actions to assess achievement against the set of standards or management goals and objectives previously fixed.

    REFERENCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS

  • Introduction to the technical session on data compilation and OGC services (Data availability)

     by Tanya Haddad and Yassine Lassoued (ICAN)

    BACKGROUND
    The technical background of a MSP plan

    OBJECTIVES
    This agenda item will introduce the sessions of the day, it will also include a general conceptualization of data, as well as additional examples on the importance of data, information and decision support tools (coastal and marine atlases) to support integrated coastal management and marine spatial planning.

    EXPECTED OUTCOMES
    - Clear understanding of data and information concepts
    - Clear understanding on the need of data and information to start the MSP process.
    - General overview on the capacity needs to undertake the technical tasks linked with the MSP process.

    DESCRIPTION OF YOUR PRESENTATION
    This session provides a high level overview of the main OGC web services (CSW, WMS, WMTS, WFS, and WCS), their principles, benefits, and available software implementations. It also introduces the main operations supported by these web services through practical examples.

    REFERENCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS

    File: 1
  • Demonstration on digitalization of proposals, conversion to OGC services for web dissemination

    by Yassine Lassoued (ICAN)

    BACKGROUND
    The preparation of the existing spatial data and information is crucial in the MSP process, and the digitalization of proposals as a way to communicate to all kind of stakeholders is considered one of the most important components of a plan.

    OBJECTIVES
    This agenda item will show the participants how to deal with spatial data and to convert specific coastal/marine data (vector / raster) into a map service for web dissemination by using QGIS. This is a demonstrative session and the trainer will lead the exercise by explaining it step by step.

    EXPECTED OUTCOMES
    - To understand how to use and exploit the spatial data in QGIS
    - To understand how to create a OGC service for web dissemination
    - To understand how the created map service can be managed.

    DESCRIPTION OF YOUR PRESENTATION
    In this practical session you will learn how to make your data available through WMS and WFS using GeoServer, an OGC-compliant Open Source software. An introduction to layer styling using SLD (Styled Layer Descriptor) will be provided.

    REFERENCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS (In English, Spanish and French)

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  • Demonstration on Web viewers development for dissemination and public participation

    by Tanya Haddad (ICAN)

    BACKGROUND
    The development of coastal and marine web atlases has exponentially increased during the last decade, the International Coastal Atlas Network, as IOC-IODE project, is leading a community of practices in order to share lessons learnt and experiences.

    OBJECTIVES
    This agenda item will illustrate the best practices on coastal and marine web atlases considering the type of audiences and the most appropriate functionalities. During the presentation, both open source and commercial licensed web atlases should be shown.

    EXPECTED OUTCOMES
    - The audience will receive clear information on good practices developing coastal and marine web atlases, the most innovative functionalities and those web atlases which consider all kind of audiences in terms of dissemination and public participation.

    DESCRIPTION OF PRESENTATION
    This presentation will describe the current landscape of choices for developing web viewers to showcase Atlas resources for browsing, analysis, and public participation. We will provide a broad overview of available viewer technologies, how to determine the various functional requirements for a web viewer implementation, and how to match those requirements to existing technologies. We will also take a tour of well executed aspects of different web atlas viewers from around the world.

    REFERENCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS (In English, Spanish and French)

  • Practical session or demonstration on Personalization of web-viewers and atlases: the case of SPINCAM and AMA

    by Yassine Lassoued (ICAN)

    BACKGROUND
    The African Marine Atlas and the SPINCAM Regional Atlas represent two examples of SmartAtlas implementation at regional scale in which UCC/CMRC and ICAN have played an active role.

    OBJECTIVES
    This agenda item will briefly present SmartAtlas and the work done in Africa and the Southeast Pacific with contributions from the audience. The demonstration will consist in a practical exercise on how to personalize the SmartAtlas viewer: uploading information, modifying the agenda, preparation of metadata, publication.

    EXPECTED OUTCOMES
    - The audience will know more about SmartAtlas and the way to use it as a practical example for them to replicate it in their own countries.

    DESCRIPTION OF PRESENTATION
    The aim of this session is to demonstrate Smart Atlas and to provide a high-level overview of how to set it up and populate it with data. Experience from SPINCAM and the African Marine Atlas will be reported.

    REFERENCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS

  • Demonstration of SeaSketch for MSP in Barbuda and the participatory development of a SeaSketch project

    by Will McClintock (ICAN)

    BACKGROUND
    SeaSketch puts powerful tools into the hands of ocean planners, stakeholders and the public that were once limited to GIS professionals, enabling participatory marine spatial planning processes that are closely tied to the relevant science and information. SeaSketch is being used around the globe in small agency teams and large community-driven initiatives to make better management decisions every day.

    OBJECTIVES
    This agenda item will be fully dedicated to demonstrating SeaSketch features to support integrated coastal area management and marine spatial planning using real-world examples..

    EXPECTED OUTCOMES
    - The audience will know more about SeaSketch as a tool to facilitate management activities in the context of coastal and marine governance.

    DESCRIPTION OF YOUR PRESENTATION
    SeaSketch (barbuda.seasketch.org) was used to develop a complete marine spatial plan for the island of Barbuda which was signed into law in August 2014. Using SeaSketch, stakeholders contributed local and expert knowledge on the distribution of natural resources and human activities. In combination with other data, this information was used to guide sketching and analysis of marine sanctuaries (no-take zones), mooring and anchorage sites, no-net zones, and shipping lanes. Map based discussion forums were used to capture stakeholder comments and deliberations over designs as well as communicate with off-site scientists. In this presentation I will demonstrate the essential SeaSketch features used by stakeholders in Barbuda, and the administrative features used by project staff.

    Using a project in SeaSketch (http://training-barbuda.seasketch.org), participants will be asked to sketch and evaluate prospective zones and share them in a discussion forum. This brief mock-planning exercise will help participants understand the process of collaborative geodesign in MSP.


    REFERENCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS

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  • Practical exercise with SeaSketch

    by Will McClintock (ICAN)

    BACKGROUND
    SeaSketch puts powerful tools into the hands of ocean planners, stakeholders and the public that were once limited to GIS professionals, enabling participatory marine spatial planning processes that are closely tied to the relevant science and information. SeaSketch is being used around the globe in small agency teams and large community-driven initiatives to make better management decisions every day.

    OBJECTIVES
    This agenda item will be fully dedicated to demonstrate the use of SeaSketch tools to support integrated coastal area management and marine spatial planning.

    EXPECTED OUTCOMES
    - The audience will have a detailed understanding of how SeaSketch may be customized to reflect the specific planning goals and objectives of a region-specific MSP process.

    DESCRIPTION OF YOUR PRESENTATION
    Participants will be invited to collaboratively build a new SeaSketch project for a real or imaginary marine spatial planning exercise, complete with map data, surveys for collecting new data, sketch classes, and discussion forums (30 min). We will discuss how SeaSketch features may address some of the challenges of working in data poor environments, data quality control and assurance, participation and transparency. Then, having been issued a project of their own, each participant will be guided through the process of configuring SeaSketch for data viewing, sketching and analysis (20 min).
    At the end of either exercise, each participant will have their own SeaSketch project (on which they are administrators) to be used for educational purposes.

    REFERENCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS